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PHOTO CREDIT: Above photo by John Rickman Photography, San Jose, California.

Γλύκα, Γλύκα, Γλυκιά Μου
(Glika, Glika, Glikia Mou)

(Sweetly, Sweetly, My Sweetheart)

 

 

This page contains a translation into English of the lyrics to the popular Greek song "Glika Glika, Glikia Mou" (Γλύκα, Γλύκα, Γλυκιά Μου), which was sung by Panayiota Yiota Halkia, Kelly Kelekidou, and Efi Thodi & Clarion Yiorgos Dimitropoulos. Also included is a pronunciation guide for the Greek lyrics so you can sing along if you like.

Song lyrics are provided for educational purposes. If you like the song, please purchase either the album or a download from an authorized source.

About this Song

Those of us from regions that speak Greek, Arabic, and Turkish have exchanged countless songs with each other through licensing the music and creating lyrics in our own languages. These include both current pop music and classics. The song translated on this page is an example of one.

The popular Turkish singer Ibrahim Tatlises recorded this song in 1975 under the title of "Oklavıyam Pazıyam", which appeared on his album Ayağında Kundura. Although it appears that Tatlises released his recording prior to our first Greek one, I dont believe the song was originally Turkish. There are many traditional folksy songs that existed before the recording industry published them. I easily can consider this one of our national Greek songs, as it's such a huge hit both in the traditional arena and the modern clubbing scene.

Many Greek music fans falsely assume that Efi Thodi was the first to introduce this song in Greece. Although she did revive its popularity in the late 1980s, she definitely wasn't the first.

Fast forward, in 2005 it became an even bigger mega hit by Kelli Kelekidou. Since Kelekidou's popular club-style release of it in 2005, this song has been a major souxe (σουξέ). Souxe, which I believe is a foreign term, is a very popular word used among Greek speakers, and it refers to something that is a major huge hit.

The modern version of "Glyka Glyka", to this day, is played in night clubs, and also of course in the diaspora. In fact, it may be even more popular among the Greek diaspora than in Greece! You have to understand, there are different clubs and venues with various music played depending on the venue.

In the diaspora, when we have our Greek nights in the nightclubs with modern Greek music, we always play this song toward the end of the night. At live music events, when singers visit the USA for a bouzoukia-style night, they also play this. It's popular in the bouzoukia in Greece. It's also played at Paniyiria (Πανηγυρια) which can be considered something like a festival, but somewhat different.

Using Glikia Glikia as an Example of Musical Styles

At the paniyiria (Greek festivals), the aesthetics of Demotic songs demonstrate a specific flavor, and are often known as rural mountain music. The popular song "Glikia Glikia" that is often played near the end of the evening at a nightclub or paniyiri shows examples of the different ways the same song can be played for different occasions.

  1. Panayiota Yiota Halkia, 1989. Illustrates pure Demotic style of music.
  2. Efi Thodi and Clarion Yiorgos Dimitropoulos, 1989. Illustrates slightly more modern paniyiria style.
  3. Kelli Kelekidou, 2005. Illustrates modern laiko style.

If you listen to all three versions of this song linked above, you will be able to understand a little bit. The composer, Makis Vasiliadis, is a renowned clarinet player. Many of the paniyiria of certain regions are empty if there is no clarinet. I personally can't tolerate hearing clarinet all night, just as many other Greeks can't tolerate hearing kemence all night.

Together, these different versions of the song present a good example illustrating Greek music's evolution.  It can be danced as either syrtos or Oriental tsifteteli, and you can even move your hips a tiny bit in the syrtos line dance known as syrto-tsifteteli.

About Panayiota Yiota Halkia

Panayiota "Yiota" Halkia is known as the Grand Lady of Demotik Music. She was born into a musical family, and her talents appeared in childhood through performances at school events. She began her professional career at age 17, where she found success performing with traditional orchestras. She went on to collaborate with many of the big names in Greek folk music. She has performed concerts throughout Greece, as well as doing tours to perform for expatriates in Australia, Canada, America, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and others. Halkia released her first album in 1980, and several others followed.

About Kelly Kelekidou

Kelly Kelekidou, who is famous for her recording of the Greek version of this song, is a very popular singer of Anatolian Greek Pontian heritage. People often refer to her by the nickname "Kel Kel". She is known for many hits including her recording of "Glyka Glyka" in 2005. Her collaboration with Pontian singer Nikos Kourkoulis led to marriage and two children.

Song: Glika, Glika, Glikia Mou (Sweetly, Sweetly, My Sweetheart), 1989

Lyrics: Panayiota Yiota Halkia

Music: Makis Vasiliadis

Original Artist: Panayiota Yiota Halkia

Has Also Been Recorded By:

  • Ibrahim Tatlises, 1975, in Turkish ("Oklavıyam Pazıyam")
  • Efi Thodi and Clarion Yiorgos Dimitropoulos, 1989, in Greek
  • Kelli Kelekidou, 2005, in Greek
  • Alexandra, 2006, in Greek
  • Giorgos Velissaris, 2018, in Greek

Dance Style: Belly Dance

Album: Teri Mou Se Perimeno (My Match, Im Waiting For You)

Τραγουδι: Γλύκα, Γλύκα, Γλυκιά Μου 1989

Στίχοι: Παναγιώτα Γιώτα Χαλκιά

Μουσική: Μάκης Βασιλειάδης

Πρώτη Εκτέλεση: Παναγιώτα Γιώτα Χαλκιά

Συμμετέχουν: Μάκης Βασιλειάδης, Κλαρίνο

Άλλοι Ερμηνευτές:

  • Ιμπραχιμ Τατλισες, 1975, Στα Τουρκικά ("Οκλαβιγιαμ Παζιγιαμ")
  • Έφη Θώδη – κλαρίνο Γιώργος Δημητρόπουλος, 1989
  • Κέλλυ Κελεκίδου, 2005

Χορός: Οριεντάλ, Χορό Της Κοιλιάς, Ανατολίτικος Χορός, Τσιφτετέλι, Χανούμικο, Κελικός Χορός

Άλμπουμ: Ταίρι Μου Σε Περιμένω

 

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Lyrics

Numbers in parentheses refer to footnotes that appear at the bottom of the translation.

Greek Lyrics

Pronunciation

English Translation

* Introduction, appears to be Caribbean accent, unsure what's said *
     
Γλύκα γλύκα, γλυκιά μου glika glika, glikia mou Sweetly sweetly (1), Sweetheart,
Γλύκα γλύκα, γλυκιά μου glika glika, glikia mou Sweetly sweetly (1), Sweetheart,
έλα στην αγκαλιά μου ela stin agalia mou come to my embrace
έλα στην αγκαλιά μου ela stin agalia mou come to my embrace
     
Έλα έλα, μικρό μου ela ela, mikro mou Come come, my little one,
έλα έλα, μικρό μου ela ela, mikro mou come come, my little one,
έλα ελα, μωρό μου ela ela, moro mou come come, my baby,
έλα έλα, μωρό μου ela ela, moro mou come come, my baby.
     
Έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume Come, let's meet again,
έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume Come, let's meet again,
τα παλιά μας, να πούμε ta palia mas, na poume the old things, to talk about,
τα παλιά μας, να πούμε ta palia mas, na poume the old things, to talk about.
     
* Introduction, appears to be Caribbean accent, unsure what's said *
     
Γλύκα γλύκα, τα φιλιά σου glika glika, ta filia sou Sweetly, sweetly (1), your kisses,
γλύκα γλύκα, τα φιλιά σου glika glika, ta filia sou Sweetly, sweetly (1), your kisses,
γλύκα και η, ομορφιά σου glika ke ee, omorfia sou sweet (1) and, your beauty,
γλύκα και η, ομορφιά σου glika ke ee, omorfia sou sweet (1) and, your beauty.
     
Έλα έλα, σε 'μένα ela ela, se 'mena Come, come, to me,
έλα έλα, σε μένα ela ela, se 'mena Come, come, to me.
μην ακούσεις, κανέναν min akousis kanenan Don't listen to anyone,
μην ακούσεις κανέναν min akousis kanenan don't listen to anyone.
     
Έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume Come, let's meet again,
έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume come, let's meet again,
τον καημό μας, να πούμε ton kaimo mas, na poume to [talk about] our sorrow,
τον καημό μας, να πούμε ton kaimo mas, na poume to [talk about] our sorrow.
     
Δώσε dose Give it! (2)
     
Γλύκα γλύκα, γλυκιά μου glika glika, glikia mou Sweetly sweetly (1), Sweetheart,
Γλύκα γλύκα, γλυκιά μου glika glika, glikia mou Sweetly sweetly (1), Sweetheart,
βάζεις μεσ' τη' καρδιά μου   You put it in my heart,
βάζεις μεσ' τη' καρδιά μου   you put it in my heart.
     
Έλα έλα, παιδί μου ela ela, pedi mou Come my child, (3)
Έλα έλα, παιδί μου ela ela, pedi mou come my child. (3)
έλα μεσ' τη', ψυχή μου ela mes' ti' psihi mou Come into my soul,
έλα μεσ' τη', ψυχή μου ela mes' ti' psihi mou come into my soul.
     
Έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume Come, let's meet again,
έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume come, let's meet again,
και μαζί να, τα βρούμε ke mazi na, ta vroume and together, let's figure things out
και μαζί να, τα βρούμε ke mazi na, ta vroume and together, let's figure things out
     

Instrumental

Instrumental

Instrumental

     
Γλύκα γλύκα glika glika Sweetly, sweetly (1)
Γλύκα γλύκα glika glika Sweetly, sweetly (1)
     
* Introduction, appears to be Caribbean accent, unsure what's said *
     
Γλύκα γλύκα, γλυκιά μου glika glika, glikia mou Sweetly sweetly (1), Sweetheart,
Γλύκα γλύκα, γλυκιά μου glika glika, glikia mou Sweetly sweetly (1), Sweetheart,
έλα στην αγκαλιά μου ela stin agalia mou come to my embrace
έλα στην αγκαλιά μου ela stin agalia mou come to my embrace
     
Έλα έλα, μικρό μου ela ela, mikro mou Come come, my little one,
έλα έλα, μικρό μου ela ela, mikro mou come come, my little one,
έλα ελα, μωρό μου ela ela, moro mou come come, my baby,
έλα έλα, μωρό μου ela ela, moro mou come come, my baby.
     
Έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume Come, let's meet again,
έλα ν' ανταμωθούμε ela n' adamothoume Come, let's meet again,
τα παλιά μας, να πούμε ta palia mas, na poume the old things, to talk about,
τα παλιά μας, να πούμε ta palia mas, na poume the old things, to talk about.
     
Tα παλιά μας, να πούμε ta palia mas, na poume The old things, to talk about.
  1. The word "glika" can mean either "sweet" or "sweetly".
  2. In this context, "Give it!" is an exclamation of joy, similar to "Opa!"
  3. Here, it's not literally talking to a child. "Child" is being used as an endearment, like calling someone "my baby".

 

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Translations of
Kelli Kelekidou's Songs On This Site

Translations on this web site of songs performed by Kelly Kelekidou (KelKel) include:

 

 

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About the Translator

This page was contributed by Panayiota Bakis Mohieddin, who is happy to share her culture and music she grew up with! Here's how Panayiota describes her background:

I always love engaging with intelligent like-minded people, especially artists. I love sharing anything and everything about my Hellenic culture and upbringing, especially music and dance. A conversation with me will bring you back to America's favorite Greek-American movie by Nia Vardalos called My Big Fat Greek Wedding.

I love investigating Greek culture, history, music, and dance. Speaking of investigating, I think I missed my calling, I probably should have been an investigator. Instead, I use those skills to dig and dig and dig tirelessly, often times falling asleep on my laptop... just to find the truth. But, most importantly, accurate truth. For me personally, and other respectable folklorists, my culture and accuracy are very important. Each generation of ethnic born artists has a duty to do the best it can to pass down our traditions as was taught to us. We have been given this artistic gift to be the gatekeepers of our heritage and culture.

Panayiota

 

 

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