Filler
Photo of Shira

 

 

PHOTO CREDIT: Above photo by John Rickman Photography, San Jose, California.

Φύγε Φύγε
(Fige, Fige)

(Leave, Leave)

 

 

This page contains a translation into English of the lyrics to the popular Greek song "Fige, Fige" (Φύγε Φύγε), which was sung by Stratos Dionisiou and Giota Lydia. Also included is a pronunciation guide for the Greek lyrics so you can sing along if you like.

For more information about the laiko and rebetiko styles of music, see Introduction to Laiko / Rebetiko Music elsewhere on this web site.

Song lyrics are provided for educational purposes. If you like the song, please purchase either the album or a download from an authorized source.

About this Song

In 1997 the Turkish version of this song, named "Çapkın," was released by former Turkish belly dancer Candan Erçetin. The word "Çapkın" translates to "womanizer". Candan is one of my favorite singers. She is also well known for her work in singing and recording Greek songs in Greek and also in Turkish.

There was a 1964 motion picture in Turkey named Çapkın Efe and there was a 1963 motion picture in Turkey named Çapkın Kiz.

About Stratos Dionisiou

Stratos Dionisiou's parents were refugees who had fled Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) to escape the genocide, and when he was only 13 years old, his father died. As a young man, while working as a tailor in Thessaloniki, Stratos Dionisiou also performed in the nightclubs as a musician. He moved to Athens to advance his singing career, recording his first song in 1959. He began achieving commercial success with a series of hits in the 1960's, followed by a successful U.S. tour.

Just as it seemed his career was taking off, he was arrested in 1973 on charges of possessing a gun and cannabis, and imprisoned for two years. He resumed his music career after serving his time.

His success continued into the 1980's.

ABOUT THE PHOTO: Stratos Dionisiou was the original artist to record the Greek version this song.

Stratos Dionisiou

About Giota Lydia

Giota Lydia, (sometimes spelled as Yiota Lydia) was the stage name of Panayiota Mantaraki. She was born in Greece, in a Greek Anatolian refugee district known as Nea Ionia, on February 24, 1934, and came from a family of singers. Her parents were refugees from Smyrna, which today is known as Izmir in Turkey.

Lydia began her career as a singer at the young age of 11, and she became one of the most renowned singers in the laiko genre of music.

Lydia has been a very prolific artist, known for her work as a recording artist. She recorded over 1,000 songs of all musical styles, on 350 record albums. Her final album, Kathara Kai Xaspera, was released in 1986.

She married her husband, Stratos Attalidi, when she was only 14 years old. He was also an artist and composer, and he promoted her career as a singer. They often appeared together as a duet act. They had a son named Stavros.

Giota Lydia

About Theodoros Derveniotis

The lyricist for this song, Theodoros Derveniotis, (nickname ‘O Hondros’), was born in 1922 in Zagora, a village in Greece. In the custom of Greeks to name children after their father's parents, O Hondros was named after his grandfather, Theodoros D. Derveniotis, a legendary folk musician.

Although the younger Theodoros appreciated folk music, he gradually fell in love with Byzantine and European music. Starting at age five, he was a Byzantine chanter at his church. Around the 1950's, Theodoros decided to try his luck as a music composer. He was self taught in several Greek instruments and reading music.

Derveniotis went on to work and collaborate with some of the biggest stars in Greek Rebetiko/Laiko music, including the great singer Stelios Kazantzidis. In 1959, this partnership came to an end due to Derveniotis deciding he'd had enough of the low income of 300 drachmas on his compositions.

When one door closes, another opens. Derveniotis moved on to his next venture of opening up a Laiko/Light musical school. His fame continued to grow, and he created countless new compositions for some of the greateast stars of Greek music. Theodoros Derveniotis passed away in 2004.

ABOUT THE PHOTO: This photo shows Theodoros Derveniotis, the legendary composer of many songs in the Greek rebetiko/laiko genre.

Theodoros Derveniotis

Song: Fige Fige (Leave Leave), 1960

Lyrics: Theodoros Derveniotis

Music: Stratos Attalidis

Original Artists: Stratos Dionisiou and Giota Lydia

Dance Style: Belly Dance

Album: Anathema Se Xenitia and Fiye Fiye (Damn You Foreign Lands and Leave Leave), Single vinyl 45 rpm, with one song on each side

Has Also Been Recorded By:

  • Candan Erçetin, 1997, in Turkish ("Çapkın") on an album also titled Çapkın. Turkish lyrics were written by Ahmet Baki Çallıoğlu.

Τραγούδι: Φύγε Φύγε, 1960

Στίχοι: Θεόδωρος Δερβενιώτης

Μουσική: Στράτος Ατταλίδης

Πρώτη Εκτέλεση: Στράτος Διονυσίου k Γιώτα Λύδια

Χορός: Οριεντάλ, Χορό Της Κοιλιάς, Ανατολίτικο Χορό, Τσιφτετέλι, Χανούμικο, Κελικός Χορός

Άλμπουμ: Ανάθεμά Σε Ξενητειά / Φύγε Φύγε (single)

Άλλοι Ερμηνευτές:

  • Τζαντάν Ερτσετίν, 1997, Στα Τουρκικά ("Τσιαπκιν"). Turkish lyrics were written by Αχμετ Μπακη Τσαλλιογλου.

 

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Lyrics

Numbers in parentheses refer to footnotes that appear at the bottom of the translation.

Greek Lyrics

Pronunciation

English Translation

Αχ – αχ - αχχχ θέλεις να μ' αφήσεις Ah – ah – ahhh thelis na m' afisis Ah – ah – ahhh You want to leave me
κaι άλλον ν' αγαπήσεις ke alon n' agapisis and to love someone else.
Φύγε, φύγε, φύγε fiye, fiye, fiye Leave, leave, leave!
     
Έχω συνηθίσει eho sinithisi I became accustomed to
να με τρώει η θλίψη na me troi ee thlipsi the sorrow eating away at me,
και αν σ' αγάπησα ke an s' agapisa and if I loved you,
ξεγελάστηκα xeyelastika I was tricked,
και τη' μοίρα μου καταράστηκα, καταράστηκα ke ti' mira mou katarastika, katarastika and I cursed, I cursed my fate.
     
Φύγε, φύγε, φύγε, φύγε fiye, fiye, fiye, fiye Leave, leave, leave, leave!
     
Αχχχ ahhh Ohhh,
πάρε την καρδιά σου pare tin kardia sou take your heart,
και για πάντα γεια σου ke ya panda yia sou and forever good-bye!
     
Γεια σου, γεια σου, γεια σου ya sou, ya sou, ya sou Good bye, good bye, good bye!
     
Έχω συνηθίσει eho sinithisi I became accustomed to
να με τρώει η θλίψη na me troi ee thlipsi the sorrow eating away at me,
και αν σ' αγάπησα ke an s' agapisa and if I loved you,
ξεγελάστηκα xeyelastika I was tricked,
και τη' μοίρα μου καταράστηκα, καταράστηκα ke ti' mira mou katarastika, katarastika and I cursed, I cursed my fate.
     
Φύγε, φύγε, φύγε, φύγε fiye, fiye, fiye, fiye Leave, leave, leave, leave!
     
Αχχχ ahhh Ohhh,
στο βαρύ μου πόνο sto vari mou pono in my heavy pain
άφησε με μόνο afise me mono leave me alone,
μόνο, μόνο, μόνο mono, mono, mono alone, alone, alone!
     
Έχω συνηθίσει eho sinithisi I became accustomed to
να με τρώει η θλίψη na me troi ee thlipsi the sorrow eating away at me,
και αν σ' αγάπησα ke an s' agapisa and if I loved you,
ξεγελάστηκα xeyelastika I was tricked,
και τη' μοίρα μου καταράστηκα, καταράστηκα ke ti' mira mou katarastika, katarastika and I cursed, I cursed my fate.
     
Φύγε, φύγε, φύγε, φύγε fiye, fiye, fiye, fiye Leave, leave, leave, leave!
     

Instrumental

Instrumental

Instrumental

     
Γεια σου Κόρο με το βιολί σου! Yia sou Koro me to violi sou! Hello Koro with your violin! (1)
  1. This was a shout-out to the violinist playing for this performance, whose name is Koro. It's a reference to Yiorgos Koros (Γιώργος Κόρος) a renowned musician who is credited as the violinist for this song.

 

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Translations of
Giota Lydia's (Yiota Lydia's) Songs On This Site

Translations on this web site of songs performed by Giota Lydia (Yiota Lydia) include:

 

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Translations of
Stratos Dionisiou's Songs On This Site

Translations on this web site of songs performed by Stratos Dionisiou include:

 

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About the Translator

This page was contributed by Panayiota Bakis Mohieddin, who is happy to share her culture and music she grew up with! Here's how Panayiota describes her background:

I always love engaging with intelligent like-minded people, especially artists. I love sharing anything and everything about my Hellenic culture and upbringing, especially music and dance. A conversation with me will bring you back to America's favorite Greek-American movie by Nia Vardalos called My Big Fat Greek Wedding.

I love investigating Greek culture, history, music, and dance. Speaking of investigating, I think I missed my calling, I probably should have been an investigator. Instead, I use those skills to dig and dig and dig tirelessly, often times falling asleep on my laptop... just to find the truth. But, most importantly, accurate truth. For me personally, and other respectable folklorists, my culture and accuracy are very important. Each generation of ethnic born artists has a duty to do the best it can to pass down our traditions as was taught to us. We have been given this artistic gift to be the gatekeepers of our heritage and culture.

Panayiota

 

 

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