Filler
Photo of Shira

 

 

PHOTO CREDIT: Above photo by John Rickman Photography, San Jose, California.

Ραγίζει Απόψε Η Καρδιά γνωστός και ως Κανείς Εδώ Δεν Τραγουδά
(Ragizi Apopse I Kardia,
also known as
Kanis Edo Den Tragouda)

(Tonight the Heart is Breaking, also known as Nobody Here is Singing)

 

This page contains a translation into English of the lyrics to the popular Greek song "Ragizi Apopse I Kardia" (Ραγίζει Απόψε Η Καρδιά), which was sung by Nikos Papazoglou. The same song was later recorded by Glykeria, but under the title "Kanis Edo Den Tragouda" (Κανείς Εδώ Δεν Τραγουδά).

This song could be used for slow, sad belly dance, perhaps at a belly dance event where freedom of expression and introspective moods are appropriate. It could be beautiful with a veil. I wouldn't use this for a performance at a party because it's a very sad song. When this song is played live at Greek events or nightclubs, the mood can change completely; however, not really the lyrics. It could have a more percussive Oriental flair or not. It all depends on the musicians. Each band expresses and improvises accordingly. In art, nothing is ever set in stone.

In 2004, a Turkish album titled Lazutlar Livera was released by Fouat Saka containing this song titled "Şimdi Ne Yapar", sung in Turkish. Foud Saka is a native of the Black Sea region of present day Turkey, Trabzon (Trapezounda). He has collaborated with the composer of the song, Nikos Papazoglou.

Also included is a pronunciation guide for the Greek lyrics so you can sing along if you like.

For more information about the laiko and rebetiko styles of music, see Introduction to Laiko / Rebetiko Music elsewhere on this web site.

Song lyrics are provided for educational purposes. If you like the song, please purchase either the album or a download from an authorized source.

About Nikos Papazoglou

Nikos Papazoglou was the original artist who recorded this song, releasing his version under the title "Ragizi Apopse Ee Kardia".

Born in Thessaloniki, Nikos Papazoglou was a popular singer, songwriter, and music producer. He began performing at the local level in the 1960's. In the mid-1970's, he met Manolis Rasoulis when they worked together on a project to create a musical based on a play by Aristophanes.

Following this, they teamed up in 1978 with Dionysis Savvopoulos and Nikos Xydakis to create a groundbreaking music album that achieved critical acclaim. Some credit this work with changing the course and perception of Greek popular music.

Building on this success, Papazoglou and Rasoulis collaborated again the following year to create another commercially successful work, Ta Dithen.

ABOUT THE PHOTO: The singer in the photo is Nikos Papazoglou.

Nikos Papazoglou

About Glykeria

Glykeria is one of the artists who has recorded this song, releasing her version under the title "Kanis Edo Den Tragouda".

Glykeria Kotsoula is the sweetheart of Greece and one of the greatest legends of our time. She was born in 1953 in Serres, Greece. Her musical style is modern laika (rebetika & folk), while still always paying tribute to the great Rebetes of the past.

Panayiota, the translator of this song, offers this personal perspective on what Glykeria's music means to her:

Glykeria's music always has and always will inspire me both on and off the stage. I admire her simplicity and humbleness despite her fame and success. While most kids were learning standard lullabies, my mother would sing all her songs to me, since I was a baby. My mother Evangelia is a huge fan and loves singing her songs. On family road trips, my mother played all her tapes over and over again. Those cassette tapes are what made me fall in love with Laika/Rebetika style music at the age of ten. Thank you Glykeria, thank you Mama! Enjoy!

Most of Glykeria's records have gone platinum. She has gained fame and respect through out the world. Glykeria collaborates with many notable international musicians, including the Turkish living legend, Omar Farouk Tekbilek.

ABOUT THE PHOTO: The singer in the photo is Glykeria.

Song:

  • Ragizi Apopse Ee Kardia (Tonight the Heart is Breaking), 1978
  • Also known as Kanis Edo Den Tragouda (Nobody Here is Singing), 1983

Lyrics: Takis Simotas

Music: Nikos Papazoglou

Original Artist: Nikos Papazoglou

Later performed by:

  • Glykeria (1983) under the title Kanis Edo Den Tragouda

Dance Style: Belly dance in situations where a sad song could be appropriate, such as an introspective veil piece.

Τραγούδι:

  • Ραγίζει Απόψε Η Καρδιά, 1978
  • γνωστός και ως Κανείς Εδώ Δεν Τραγουδά, 1983

Στίχοι: Τάκης Σιμώτας

Μουσική: Νίκος Παπάζογλου

Πρώτη εκτέλεση: Νίκος Παπάζογλου

Ερμηνεία: Γλυκερία (1983)

 

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Lyrics

This song has been recorded by both Nikos Papazoglou (1978) and Glykeria (1983). Translations appear below for both artists' versions of the lyrics.

Nikos Papazoglou's Version

When Nikos Papazoglou originally released this song, he used the title "Ragizi Apopse Ee Kardia" (Ραγίζει Απόψε Η Καρδιά).

Numbers in parentheses refer to footnotes that appear at the bottom of the translation.

Greek Lyrics

Pronunciation

English Translation

Ραγίζει απόψε η καρδιά rayizi apopse ee kardia Tonight the heart is shattering
με το μπαγλαμαδάκι me to baglamadaki with the baglamadaki. (1)
πολλά κομμάτια έγινε polla komatia eyine It broke into many pieces. (2)
σπασμένο ποτηράκι spasmeno potiraki Broken little drinking glass
     
Θυμήθηκα που πίναμε thimithika pou piname I remembered when we were drinking
σε τούτο το τραπέζι se touto to trapezi at this table, 
τώρα ποιος ξέρει πού γυρνά tora pios xeri pou yirna and now who knows where you're wandering,
ποιος ξέρει τι γυρεύει pios xeri ti yirevi who knows what you are looking for
     
Κανείς εδώ δε τραγουδά kanis edo den tragouda Nobody here is singing,
κανένας δε χορεύει kanenas de horevi nobody here is dancing.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
     
Τυχαία δήθεν αν τη δεις tihea dithen an ti dis If you run into her, (3)
φέρ' την στο ταβερνάκι fer'tin sto tavernaki bring her to the tavern.
κρυμμένος θα `μαι στη γωνιά krimenos tha 'me sti gonia I will be hiding in the corner 
για να τη δω λιγάκι ya na ti do ligaki so I can just see her for a bit
     
Κανείς εδώ δε τραγουδά kanis edo den tragouda Nobody here is singing,
κανένας δε χορεύει kanenas de horevi nobody here is dancing.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
  1. A baglamadaki is an Anatolian musical stringed instrument that is plucked. When the Greeks of Anatolia (the region where modern-day Turkey resides) arrived in mainland Greece as war refugees in the 1920's, they brought their own music. This music was not in favor with the mainland Greeks in their new home, and neither were its musicians. Our Anatolian Greek artists were associated with crime and drugs. Greece made it illegal to be seen carying a bouzouki (a larger stringed instrument). Anybody caught with one would be jailed and their beloved instrument destroyed. And thus, the mini baglamadaki was born. It was small enough to be hidden under one's garments, yet powerful enough to move you to tears and dance.
  2. Literally, "became many pieces".
  3. Literally, "if you randomly see her".

 

Glykeria's Version

The version of this song that Glykeria recorded was released under the title "Kanis Edo Den Tragouda" (Κανείς Εδώ Δεν Τραγουδά).

Numbers in parentheses refer to footnotes that appear at the bottom of the translation.

Greek Lyrics

Pronunciation

English Translation

Ραγίζει απόψε η καρδιά rayizi apopse ee kardia Tonight the heart is shattering
με το μπαγλαμαδάκι me to baglamadaki with the baglamadaki (1)
πολλά κομμάτια έγινε polla komatia eyine It broke into many pieces. (2)
σπασμένο ποτηράκι spasmeno potiraki Broken little drinking glass.
     
Θυμήθηκα που πίναμε thimithika pou piname I remembered when we were drinking
σε τούτο το τραπέζι se touto to trapezi at this table, 
τώρα ποιος ξέρει πού γυρνά tora pios xeri pou yirna and now who knows where you're wandering,
ποιος ξέρει τι γυρεύει pios xeri ti yirevi who knows what you are looking for
     
Κανείς εδώ δε τραγουδά kanis edo den tragouda Nobody here is singing,
κανένας δε χορεύει kanenas de horevi nobody here is dancing.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
     
Τυχαία δήθεν αν τον δεις tihea dithen an ton dees If you run into him, (3)
φέρ' τον στο ταβερνάκι fer'ton sto tavernaki bring him to the tavern
κρυμμένη θα `μαι στη γωνιά krimeni tha 'me sti gonia I will be hiding in the corner
για να τον δω λιγάκι ya na ton do ligaki so I can just see him for a bit.
     
Κανείς εδώ δε τραγουδά kanis edo den tragouda Nobody here is singing,
κανένας δε χορεύει kanenas de horevi nobody here is dancing.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
ακούνε μόνο την πενιά akoune mono tin penia They are just listening to the strings of the instrument being plucked.
κι ο νους τους ταξιδεύει ke o nous tous taxidevi And their attention is wandering.
  1. A baglamadaki is an Anatolian musical stringed instrument that is plucked. When the Greeks of Anatolia (the region where modern-day Turkey resides) arrived in mainland Greece as war refugees in the 1920's, they brought their own music. This music was not in favor with the mainland Greeks in their new home, and neither were its musicians. Our Anatolian Greek artists were associated with crime and drugs. Greece made it illegal to be seen carying a bouzouki (a larger stringed instrument). Anybody caught with one would be jailed and their beloved instrument destroyed. And thus, the mini baglamadaki was born. It was small enough to be hidden under one's garments, yet powerful enough to move you to tears and dance.
  2. Literally, "became many pieces".
  3. Literally, "if you randomly see him".

 

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Where to Get Recordings of this Song

Note

Listen to Clip

Artist: Foud Saka
Album Title: Lazutlar Livera
Language Sung In: Turkish
Song Title Used on this Album: "Şimdi Ne Yapar"
Year Released: 2004

 

 

Artist: Glykeria
Album Title: Me Ti Glykeria Stin Omorfi Nihta
Song Title Used on this Album: "Kanis Edo Den Tragouda"
Year Released: 1984

  Artist: Nikos Papazoglou
Album Title: Ston Seirio Iparhoun Pedia
Song Title Used on this Album: "Ragizi Apopse Ee Kardia"

 

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Translations of
Nikos Papazoglou's Songs On This Site

Translations on this web site of lyrics for songs performed by Nikos Papazoglu include:

 

---------------

Translations of
Glykeria's Songs On This Site

Other translations on this web site for songs performed by Glykeria Kotsoula include:

 

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About the Translator

This page was contributed by Panayiota Bakis Mohieddin, who is happy to share her culture and music she grew up with! Here's how Panayiota describes her background:

I always love engaging with intelligent like-minded people, especially artists. I love sharing anything and everything about my Hellenic culture and upbringing, especially music and dance. A conversation with me will bring you back to America's favorite Greek-American movie by Nia Vardalos called My Big Fat Greek Wedding.

I love investigating Greek culture, history, music, and dance. Speaking of investigating, I think I missed my calling, I probably should have been an investigator. Instead, I use those skills to dig and dig and dig tirelessly, often times falling asleep on my laptop... just to find the truth. But, most importantly, accurate truth. For me personally, and other respectable folklorists, my culture and accuracy are very important. Each generation of ethnic born artists has a duty to do the best it can to pass down our traditions as was taught to us. We have been given this artistic gift to be the gatekeepers of our heritage and culture.

Panayiota

 

 

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